Confessions

These standards are our Confession of Faith. They summarise what we as church believe. They are quoted or referred to throughout the resources on this website including the sermons.
Order by : Name | Date | Hits [ Ascendant ]

The Nicene Creed The Nicene Creed
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The Nicene Creed, also called the Nicaeno-Constantinopolitan Creed, is a statement of the orthodox faith of the early Christian church, in opposition to certain heresies, especially Arianism. These heresies concerned the doctrine of the Trinity and of the person of Christ.

The Heidelberg Catechism The Heidelberg Catechism
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The Heidelberg Catechism, the second of our doctrinal standards, was written in Heidelberg at the request of Elector Frederick III, ruler of the most influential German province, the Palatinate, from 1559 to 1576.

THE CANONS OF DORT THE CANONS OF DORT
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The third of our doctrinal standards is the Canons of Dort, also called the Five Articles against the Remonstrants. These are statements of doctrine adopted by the great Reformed Synod of Dort in 1618-1619.

The Belgic Confession The Belgic Confession
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The first of the doctrinal standards of the Canadian Reformed Churches is the Confession of Faith. It is usually called the Belgic Confession because it originated in the Southern Netherlands, now known as Belgium. Its chief author was Guido de Brès, a preacher of the Reformed Churches of the Netherlands, who died a martyr to the faith in the year 1567.

The Athanasian Creed The Athanasian Creed
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This creed is named after Athanasius (293-373 A.D.), the champion of orthodoxy over against Arian attacks on the doctrine of the Trinity. Although Athanasius did not write this creed and it is improperly called after him, the name persists because until the seventeenth century it was commonly ascribed to him.

The Apostles' Creed The Apostles' Creed
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This creed is called the Apostles' Creed, not because it was written by the apostles themselves, but because it contains a brief summary of their teachings. It sets forth their doctrine, as has been said, "in sublime simplicity, in unsurpassable brevity, in beautiful order, and with liturgical solemnity."